Friday, June 10, 2011

Gov't to encourage foreigners with specialized skills to work in Japan

Are there many foreign workers/professionals in Japan?

Shibuya Crossing
Source: Tokyo Images

(Japan Today) TOKYO - The Japanese government outlined Thursday plans to give preferential treatment to foreigners with specialized skills, depending on their research achievements, academic background and other points, to encourage them to work in Japan.
The Ministry of Justice plans to put the point system, by which their visas of up to three years can be extended to five years, into effect by the end of this year amid intensifying international competition for competent human resources, especially engineers.
Under the system, the government will give points to foreigners by checking their annual income, work experience, and other factors, and extend the visas or give other preferential treatment to those with a certain level of points.
The possession of a master’s business degree and the frequency of published research papers will likely be valued highly in the check system.
Those subject to the system will be university professors, researchers, business managers, doctors, lawyers and other highly specialized professionals, according to the outline.
Vocabulary Words: Read the vocabulary words . Make your own sentence using the vocabulary word/s afterwards.
preferential treatment (n.): job or employment preference given to someone who has the proper training and skills
specialized (adj.): developed or designed for a special activity or function
achievement (n.): successful completion; accomplishment; success
amid (prep.): among; in the middle of
intensifying (adj.):  increasing in strength
competent (adj.): properly or sufficiently qualified; capable
possession (n.): something owned; something that a person has
outline (n. or v.): summary or summarize


Comprehension check: Answer the questions based on the article.
1. What does the Japanese government say about hiring foreign employees?
2. Is there an international competition for human resources? Who are the most "needed" people?
3. What does the Ministry of Justice plan to put up?
4. How will the foreigners receive points?
5. According to the outline, who are the people likely to be chosen to work in Japan? (What are their jobs?)


Follow-up:
1. Do you think Japanese people should hire foreigners to work and live in Japan?
2. In your opinion, what is the reason why the Japanese government wants to hire foreigners?
3.. Do you like to work abroad?

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